3.01.2010

welcome to slow love life

My new book, Slow Love, describes a journey through the panic and grief of losing my job--and the unhappy realization that I had been neglecting lots of other things in my life. Important things, like love, and health, and friendships. I was forced to make big changes in the way I live. I sold the house in which I had raised my children, and the garden I had devoted myself to for twenty years. I made my peace with a troubled relationship.

Then I settled into a new life of writing, and cooking, and tending friendships, and home making, and learning to be a mom to grown-up sons. I rediscovered things I had once loved: serious reading, playing the piano, long walks, learning about the environment. Slow living led me to falling in love with the world, experiencing what I think of as slow love.

I want to continue the conversation I have been having with my friends about what slow love means. I want to deepen my understanding of engaging with the world in a more meaningful way--especially as things seem to be speeding up all around us. That’s what this blog will explore. I found a great deal of happiness on the other side of my despair, but I still have my dark days, my muddled times. I want Slow Love Life to be a way to share it all; let this conversation give us solace, inspiration, company and hope.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hello. I'd like to commend you on your lovely article, posted on the online NYT today. You really, really nailed what it's like -- waking up day after day, not knowing what one is supposed to be doing with one's time, working to quell the constant anxiety that one will never again make something of one's life. Doris Grumbach has written so well too of these kinds of days in which one has to crate one's own structure, but for her it seemed easier - solitude with one's thoughts was a life she CHOSE, after all!

I'll look forward to reading your book. Best wishes to you! And happy spring :)

TMS in Asheville

Anonymous said...

What a happy surprise to find you in the NYT today. I have always loved your writing, and your last book remains in my library despite the real estate agent's instruction to pare down our books. I look forward to the new one. Best wishes to you.

victoria thorne said...

I'm thrilled to *see* you; your writing (and vision) have played such a major, major part in my life (as they have in the lives of so very many others!). What an honor, that you are here. What a delight, that the conversation continues! Awe-inspiring; and cause to take a deep breath, slow down, and read on . . .

Clara Walmsley said...

Dominique, I am so moved to see you grappling with this essential journey from living inside the box to expanding into a much larger world. There is so much to see, to feel to notice, to experience and you capture that so beautifully in this blog. Let me add that I've always thought you had a wonderful eye . I remember seeing you about a million years ago and you were wearing a simple black dress with the most beautiful little blue earrings that matched your eyes. It is so satisfying to see you applying that your very keen eye for the beautiful in your photographs. Wishing you all the best in your new life. Clara Walmsley

clara walmsley said...

Lordy, let me redo that post . Typos aplenty. That's what I get for writing this before having my coffee !

Emom said...

I want to thank you for starting this blog. I have always enjoyed your articles as previously published. I, too, went through a life changing period a couple of years ago. I wasn't entirely sure that I would recover from the pain, shock and total disillusionment. But I have, so can you. I intend to read all of your posts from the begininng, so keep up the posting.....smiles.

Anonymous said...

What a thrill to see your name in the NYT webpage!

Read the article with a heavy heart, tears in my eyes, but oh so happy to be reading your words again.

I am one of those former subscribers to H&G. One who looked forward to the magazine in my mailbox every month, ... just to read your editorial. Although gardening is my main interest, my style is more Metropolitan Home, to which I subscribed too ...

So glad you are continuing the conversation!

Ann Vargas said...

I was very inspired by your article and can't wait to explore your blog more deeply.

Rudy Wark said...

Hi,
I just been read your article online NYT last night.
Good article specialy the part about saturday where nobody working and you not fell guilty or sunday blues... I feel the same than you...
I have been fired 3 years ago from big company. By the way I living in France and the gouvernement pay my flat for me 3 years now. Because we have the social security without that I will be a homeless with my family thanks God we have this system in place.

Now I change new carreer I pro blogger... Marketer.

I can spend more time with my kids...

you can check out my blog: nichedepot.biz

Jonclaude from Paris

Anonymous said...

I too am traveling this same road except mine is by choice. My life was my job and there were significant parts of me that had been ignored because of long work days and numb exhausted evenings. I neglected friends, family and most of all myself so I decided to retire at a relative early age (mid 50s). The challenge for me is learning and relearning how to do non work things, all those things I said I'd do if I only had the time, get more exercise, play more music, redo my terribly messy overgrown garden, redo my house....... well, you get the picture. I love the NYT piece (which I read today) because it spoke to so many of my own holes. I look forward to the book and to further connections and discussions on your blog.

CI in virginia