4.08.2010

SLOW ME UP! hellebores

I'm crazy about them; they have such trusting faces, and you have to turn them up to look you in the eye, just as you would the face of a small, shy child when you want his attention. Mikel Folcarelli and John Gwynne, two of my favorite gardeners (and people) call my fixation going to hellabore. Margaret Roach has a beautiful slide show on her excellent site; this is a lovely time to visit her garden. She calls her fixation hellebore porn. Rating, anyone?

6 comments:

lostpastremembered said...

Thanks for Hellaboria at Ms Roach's site...yowza!! They are natural masters of color and form. Wasn't it H&G that had a spread about that wonderful Christopher Beane who did uber-closeups of them? Even the veining is rock star spectacular like a Fortuny fabric.

Dominique said...

I am so glad you remember that story we did in HG--one of my favorites. It was shot by the gifted Chris Baker, who is also hellaboracious. (Okay, we'll have to stop talking this way.) Chris Beane is another wonderful photographer whose stunning plant portraiture we ran in our pages. I'll have to find out what each of them is working on these days. d

Linda Landig said...

I have a low glass bowl of hellebores on my coffee table right now. I cut them just beneath the bloom and let them float of the surface of the water. They look like exotic lily pad blossoms and have lasted nearly 2 weeks.

eileenerb said...

I love them, too, but they aren't loving me. I planted several but only the one with the light greenish blooms (no complaints) survived. I live in California and maybe, like peonies, they prefer a hard freeze?

Jeanne M. Hannah said...

Oh, I love Hellebores so. When I lived near the water on Lake Michigan, I had such wonderful little micro-climates that in one garden I was actually able to grow H. x sternii and H. argutifolius -- both Zone 7 plants. [Northern Michigan is Zone 5].

I have one dear and treasured H. thibetanus -- the sole survivor of three that I purchased for $50 each about 10 years ago in my years of voracious amassing of collectible plants. I then had many garden rooms, a large koi pond, 1.5 acres under cultivation, and 125 species that I could call by the Latin names.

Like you, I have moved. And I've moved my gardens twice! No small task! The Arisaema all fell victim to the moves. But I have moved on. At age 69, I am working with a career coach to refine my goals and strategies. My reward for one of the tasks I've chosen is a new ornamental grass garden. ;-)

Jasmine Lamb said...

Amazing plant. I saw one in a garden a few weeks ago and stood there in awe and shock. Perfect. And I didn't know what it was called. So thanks for telling me.