8.13.2011

IS SEA GLASS GETTING HARDER TO FIND?


Could it possibly be true? Someone told me that beachcombers are having a harder time finding sea glass, because we're all using plastic bottles these days...I was incredulous, and then I started noticing that I wasn't seeing much during my beach walks. But that's probably because everyone gets there before me. Still, my treasure trove looks more valuable than ever....

21 comments:

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

You know, I've never found any. Most of the beaches I've walked on are southern ones, and shells are the only prizes I've found.

karenleslie said...

treasure trove indeed -- what a beautiful picture ... almost painterly. i adore sea glass, especially that pale green color and was inspired to tile a bathroom in frosted green glass. it's soothing and clean and begs to be caressed...

Lynne Rutter said...

lovely. like african beads.
It isn't just the plastic bottles taking over, I think people have been littering less, and recycling glass more. Not as many beer bottles being tossed in the water as before.

Ashling said...

That's a photo worth framing!

Shelley said...

I can't compare with earlier times as I've only picked it up in the last few years. I would say that I mainly find white and green - the colour of wine bottles! (And that is starting to come in boxes and bags, isn't it?) Haven't done anything with mine yet, but hope to take a jewelery making class soon to re-fashion some pieces I inherited (costume stuff) and might get some ideas for the glass I have.

Diane said...

it isn't only that we're using more plastic bottles. It's that we're recycling more, something we should all be proud of. I love my sea glass, collected over a lifetime of beach walks but rarely find any anymore. In our early boating years we found a treasure trove of beach glass on an island in Boston Harbor once used as a dump site.

SweetRetreat said...

I just love sea glass and look for it every time I'm at an ocean beach. Not only is it a treasure to find, but such good exercise, all that bending and stooping.

Where is David Terry? I'm missing his interesting Southern tales. Surely there is a sea glass collection in his life.

Judith Ross said...

"SweetRetreat" isn't the only one who misses David Terry. I hope he comes back soon.

Carolyn said...

I have noticed this in the last few years, whether it is on Atlantic or Pacific. Could that be the reason? How sad and scary this is!

Cheryl said...

Yet another reason to dislike plastic. Thanks, Dominique. Insightful as usual...

profA said...

Yes. Used to find a lot on Atlantic beaches. Not so much on Lake Michigan (Illinois side). Aside from the plastic, might it also have something to do with quality of glass used in bottles? Thinner? More breakable-into-smithereenish? Missing beach glass...and David Terry!
Maybe he is just too busy harvesting and canning up a storm.
Linda B.

casacara said...

Yes, Dominique, that observation is true, for the reasons already mentioned. Nearly 30 years ago, I used to collect beach glass quite scientifically on Fire Island, N.Y.(and I wasn't the only one). Best pickings were at low tide, after a storm, and particularly around March, after the winter storms had deposited their detritus, and the hordes of beach-glass collectors hadn't yet descended. And without sunglasses, the better to spot green glass among the stones. I amassed several jars of prized, well-worn sea glass -- and even wrote an article about collecting it for Newsday, the Long Island newspaper, in August '83 (it's not online, unfortunately). I no longer have my collection in jars. When we were having the cement sidewalk outside our Brooklyn townhouse re-done in the late '80s or '90s, I came running out with my jars of beach glass while the workmen were mixing the cement, and asked them to add it to the aggregate. And so my collection is set in stone, and should last for some decades to come. It's particularly beautiful when it rains. Then all the colors glisten.

CHC said...

I miss my beach glass...brown and clear, sometimes green now, if at all.

You know what else is missing....sand dollars! Growing up you could pick up handsful, now none!

Darling woman, you spend so much time telling us wonderful tales. With 15 months before the election, can you try not to mix the beauty of seaglass with politicians, they all are making me ill.

Thank you.

Anonymous said...

"Missing ... David Terry!"

Definitely the odd man out around here, but I just logged on and had the direct opposite reaction -- ie so grateful to see he's still absent!

But, heck, such is blog-commenter reality. The regular commenter roundtable here adores him, folks such as myself have the option to not read his remarks, pretty simple math.

The guy should really think about starting a blog of his own, he has one helluva following.

-Odd Man

Catherine Bitter said...

I am still able to find some along the river by my house,
but even in our little town, it seems more and more beach visitors are searching for sea glass.

If you are feeling deprived of the real thing, I highly recommend checking out my friend Celia Pearson's beautiful photographs in her book with Richard LaMotte, "Pure Sea Glass". The photos are exquisite and the the descriptions of the various colors, types and ages of sea glass are fascinating.

Jennifer B said...

Living in Northern California, we have access to a state park in Mendocino called "Glass Beach." Here's a link with a bit of info on how the beach came about:
http://www.mendocino.com/?id=257
Cheers!

Perky said...

am liking that pink piece, where did you find that? I think the scarcity is because people are picking more, and that jewelry seems to be trendy now.

But some of us keep seeding....

:-)

karenleslie said...

not missing david terry either... for me, his comments have dominated the conversation lately and it feels like enough-already. however, this is dominique's blog -- not mine -- and she appears to appreciate him, so i'll continue doing what anonymous does -- just skip over his comments...

Pigtown-Design said...

Funnily enough, I walk along a small beach in the middle of Baltimore, and I ALWAYS find beach glass. There used to be glass factories along the shores, so there's still plenty of glass washing up. Of course, being in the middl eof a city, you've got to watch out for the other scary stuff on the beach!

Kerstin said...

I've wondered why there seems to be a dearth of sea glass. Our increasing consumption of plastic would be one explanation. More mag. recently published an insightful article on how our oceans are choking on plastic: This Lady Talks Trash.

Recycling isn't enough. We need to stop using it.

Thank you for your political posts. I used to blog about knitting and went political during the Bush years. I was told to just shut up and "get back to the knitting." I didn't, but the snide comments from the angry right wore me down. I would suggest coating yourself in Teflon if it wasn't so darn toxic.

Tru Dillon said...

where I live there is an active group that scours the beach in a serious methodical way to find beach glass. they use it for jewelry.