4.11.2014

LIFE WITH MY CAMERA


Heads up! Essay in the New York Times Travel section on having a camera, which happened thanks to this blog--and your enthusiasm and encouragement. With thanks!

Pictures here display my moss/wood/rock obsession....and after the soggy spring we've had, there's plenty of enchantment around.


21 comments:

Maria Grasso said...

Beautiful essay! I too love to explore with my camera, and I am slowed down by wanting to capture the details in a landscape, building, or petal like I'm drawn to the smaller
moments in life.

JSBB said...

High time this blog made the Big Time(s)!

linda said...

Your words always speak to my heart thank you. PLEASE A BOOK ABOUT THE NEW HOME AND WHERE ARE THE PICTURES FOR THE BLOG.

Banno said...

Beautifully written. I enjoyed reading about your experience with the camera, your way of seeing things, your journey through life with and without the camera.

Judith said...

I am so glad that you picked up that camera and the Times essay hits many, many chords with me.

Ginger G said...

... and I, too dawdle when walking with friends, not wanting to miss a special picture of a blooming branch, a pinecone or single blossom lying amongst a bed of pine needles ... or, as I just did now, a squirrel's furry tail popping up from a tangle of ivy.

Gretchen Fletcher said...

Dominique, I feel as if I know you - or that I would enjoy knowing you. I, too, "see the world in a grain of sand." Years ago I wrote: "There are those who view the world through wide angle lenses and those, of whom I am one, who view it through zoom lenses. Wise-angle people, while walking through the woods or along the beach, see the panorama, the whole picture, the hills beyond the clearing, the sea as it meets the clouds on the horizon. Some of my best friends are wide-angle people. Zoom-lens people, on the same walks, see the small, the particular, the ant carrying a beetle wing, the sand flea in the sea weed. Wide-angle people walk with their heads up; zoom people with theirs down. Then too, there are those who walk through life with their lens covers on." I wish I could walk the beach or the woods with you. You see the way I do. Thanks for your essay in this morning's Times. Gretchen Fletcher

Karensandburg said...

You have slowed down and in slowing down you see things you would not have seen otherwise. I've always enjoyed your close up views (but occasionally frustrated too - I want the long view, the context). Lately I too find myself taking in details I never noticed before on the same hourly walk through the woods. I sent photos to my daughter of our dogs against these views. "Wow! Where is that?" came her reply. I enjoy being dazzled by a viewpoint that was simply waiting to be noticed. One that had been there all along.

William said...

A good balance between 'seeing' and recording is essential. There is no more disturbing and dizzying sight than the large groups of Japanese tourists at the Louvre literally running from one significant work of art to the next with their cameras in hand. Run, run, run, snap, snap snap, repeat, and repeat again, and again - appearing to delay actually 'experiencing' their journey until they get home and download the pictures.

Christopher Bonney said...

(If the name's familiar, it's because I'm Grace's father.)

Enjoyed your piece in the Times immensely. In photographing our travels there's always an urge to make the grand photographs or capture something in the camera that says "I was here." But over the years I, too, have found that these "smaller moments"--little details of places and compositions of light and shadow that have no specific landmark orientation--to be far more engaging visually and special in the way viewing these photographs again and again draws me back into the moments when I first experienced them and saved what i could of their appearance, sound and mood with the camera. Twyla Tharp, I believe is it, refers to this as "seeing small," and there's even a small movement in photography known as Mik Sang that celebrates the elegance of these ephemeral moments that perhaps only we who capture them notice. Some people never notice these moments.

Shri Ram said...

ways to maintain long distance relationship with teen ..

katrinakenison said...

Dominique, As so often happens, your writing lands in the center of my own heart. This year I've had to give up running, a form of exercise I miss daily. But slowing down, walking with my camera in hand, attending to the smallest details of my world rather than moving quickly through it, I'm reminded that there is grace in loss, beauty in the details, more than one way to go forward. A soul journey to be sure. Grateful to imagine you sharing the path.

Lisa Parisot said...

I loved the essay. It spoke to me and the way I shoot images. I prefer looking at the world close up and find those images touch others more than the wide vistas. My life has slowed considerably since hip replacement and I find these slow journeys help me to discover the beauty in the world. For nearly a year, I shot only images in my backyard and close to home. I am wandering further from home now, but I am still drawn to the close ups. Thank you for the wonderful words explaining what you see, and helping me to understand how important it is to get in close and study the details.

rebecca @ altared spaces said...

total pleasure!

Jan Powers said...

Wonderful piece in the Times - as always your words inspire me - I've gotten into the habit lately of using my phone so often, but really want to get a new, small camera -Dominique, can you give me any recommendations?

Jayne said...

I missed that piece so I am glad I checked the blog! WOnderful piece, and as I prepare for a move South, I am inundated with photos! I had a huge interest in photography from a young age and now have boxes to determine whether to keep or toss. Funny while studying art at Vassar, I lobbied to take photography at a nearby college for credit and I was turned down! But I kept up the photo taking! Your last paragraph is the perfect statement and summary! Sometimes a picture is not worth a thousand words - sometimes words like yours are worth a billion photos!

slowlovelifedominique said...

I just use a Canon point and shoot--nothing fancy. I still know nothing about cameras. And I take loads of pictures on my iPhone, too. The quality now is as good as that of most inexpensive cameras.

SlowLoveLifeDominique said...

Hello there Grace's father, and how lovely to have you visit. You have a marvelous daughter. And yes, Twyla Tharp has written beautifully about movement, seeing, creativity, intertwined. I will look up to learn more about Mik Sang, how fascinating that sounds.

SlowLoveLifeDominique said...

wise-angle people. wow. there's a great one. many thanks.

SlowLoveLifeDominique said...

thank you dear Judith....snap on!

pai young said...

Uggs Bailey Sale Uggs Mini Bailey Button Bestellen blokkeert me, dood. Binnenkort Lihou, liep naar voren, Dragon-order heeft om meer te lopen dan de helft, naar de top van de belangrijkste Hof vandaag bereiken. Op dit moment alleen Uggs Bailey Sale de harten van de grenzeloze woede, hij is nu gewoon wilt weten is het een oorlog, ook al bewust van hun verloren kracht, hij zou vechten, alleen maar om .

besteden, weet de praktijk van vandaag is niet rationeel, maar de mensen zijn er zijn Uggs Bailey Sale bloedige, als hij vandaag koos stilte, dan zal het een knoop van zijn leven te zijn. Nou, jongen, daar was ik, wilde het UGG Kensington Bestellen volgende leven aan boord, zoals Dragon-bestellen.  wind snel Lenghe, zag Uggs Bailey Sale ik in de lucht zweven, dat donker blauwe klokken rechtstreeks dreef aan de voorzijde, met uitzicht op de richting van de bel mond, dan is vliegen met de wind plotseling gebombardeerd sloeg de klok aan de achterkant van de blauwe.

Uggs Bailey Sale Mysterieuze magische groene bel gerommel beneden alle peil een uiterst krachtige sonische verspreiding van crashen van de bel mond, plotseling iedereen voelt gewoon Perfect Storm algemeen. Ah. Mijn oor doet pijn ah. Aan de achterzijde van de leerlingen slechts een geest Goedkope Uggs een Uggs Bailey Sale tintelend gevoel kwam, waren riep. Honderd en vijftig hoofdstukken mysterieuze groene bel mond hing de haak spoor van minachting glimlach.